Friday, February 7, 2014

Video Editing

I've recently been studying the science of THERE ARE NO GOOD VIDEO EDITORS FOR LINUX! It's kind of annoying.

LazerBlade's Funhouse episode 2 (LMMS Revival) was a grotesque pain to edit, because openshot literally had a 50/50 chance of crashing every time I did anything. That video wasn't even that complicated. The one I'm shooting right now however, is several levels more complicated, and I'm not prepared to deal with the crashiness of Openshot or PiTiVi while trying to edit it.

And yes, I know Lightworks has a free version for Linux. The problem is, they only have a 64-bit version, which means I'll need to install a 64-bit distro alongside my 32-bit one (since I run 32-bit because a number of things have broken 64-bit versions). This completely defeats the purpose of a Linux video editor, because if I wanted to reboot every time I wanted to edit videos, I could just reboot into my Windows installation.

Maybe PiTiVi has cleaned up its act since I phased it out in the end of Music Hacker season 2? Let me try it...

Nope. It's broken to the point where it's not even arguably usable. Maybe it's just some idiosyncrasy with my setup, but the effect is the same. I now have to go learn a new video editor, and then be doomed to reboot every time I want to do video editing.

I am so miffed that I wrote a rant that was long enough that it seemed out of place for a little Google+ blip, so I wrote a small but whole blog post about it.

    --LazerBlade

4 comments:

  1. So true. And on Windows there are even fewer. I had hoped VLMC (Video Lan Movie Creator) would be the next thing, but it was abandoned I think.

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    1. I've been using Kdenlive, and have been very happy with it. It's Linux and FOSS too.

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  2. Been going through this pain as well a while ago. Both PiTiVi and OpenShot are pretty garbage regarding crashes and features. I've settled with Kdenlive and did a lot of work with it, almost no crashes at all, maybe none at all hmm
    It fetches some KDE dependencies as I recall, but oh well, that's not more than a few hundred mb.

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    1. I think we can settle on that Kdenlive is by far the most useful and stable.

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